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Name's Alicia.
25.
Librarian.
Fangirl.
Potterhead. Whovian. Team Free Will.
Horror Gal.
Movie/TV Buff.
Collector.
Owner of tattoos and piercings alike.
Psychotic break survivor.
Realistic Optimist.
Jaded in all the fun ways.
Feel free to ask me anything. I like answering questions.
THIS IS NOT A SPOILER FREE BLOG.
Movies I Watched in 2013: #13
Comic Book Confidential (1988). Lynda Barry. Charles Burns. Sue Coe.
Documentary.
Rewatch.
I first saw this film for a comics class that I took in undergrad and I just loved it. It was the first time that I had really heard any of the official history of comics and graphic novels and I was blown away—there’re really no other words for it. I couldn’t believe that things like the epic court battles existed or that there was so much hate from librarians and educators. All of these things happened though and I’m really glad that this film introduced me to those elements of pop culture history.
I got a chance to revisit this film in my current class for Comics and Librarians. A lot of the other people in the class haven’t seen the film but they also come from a variety of backgrounds which don’t necessarily mean that they know the history of comics. The film is still a good one for this history, but I’m actually having more of a problem with people in the class pointing out that the film appears dated. Yes, the film has some songs and some interviews that are clearly dated but that in no way should deter someone from watching the film. There are interviews here that can never be repeated because some of our comics founders have died and these interviews are as good as any other ones. If you’re interested in learning the history, the steps of creation, or if you’re interested in hearing from some legendary creators, this is an excellent documentary.

Movies I Watched in 2013: #13

Comic Book Confidential (1988). Lynda Barry. Charles Burns. Sue Coe.

Documentary.

Rewatch.

I first saw this film for a comics class that I took in undergrad and I just loved it. It was the first time that I had really heard any of the official history of comics and graphic novels and I was blown away—there’re really no other words for it. I couldn’t believe that things like the epic court battles existed or that there was so much hate from librarians and educators. All of these things happened though and I’m really glad that this film introduced me to those elements of pop culture history.

I got a chance to revisit this film in my current class for Comics and Librarians. A lot of the other people in the class haven’t seen the film but they also come from a variety of backgrounds which don’t necessarily mean that they know the history of comics. The film is still a good one for this history, but I’m actually having more of a problem with people in the class pointing out that the film appears dated. Yes, the film has some songs and some interviews that are clearly dated but that in no way should deter someone from watching the film. There are interviews here that can never be repeated because some of our comics founders have died and these interviews are as good as any other ones. If you’re interested in learning the history, the steps of creation, or if you’re interested in hearing from some legendary creators, this is an excellent documentary.